Patent Leather Definition:  Definitions for the Clothing & Fabric Industry
 

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Patent leather
is leather that has been given a high gloss finish. The original process was developed by Newark, New Jersey based inventor Seth Boyden in 1818 with commercial manufacture beginning September 20, 1819. His process used a linseed oil based lacquer coating. Modern patent leather usually has a plastic coating.

Patent leather is sometimes confused with poromeric imitation leathers such as DuPont's Corfam and Kuraray Co.'s Clarino which are manmade materials with a similar glossy appearance.

Patent leather and poromerics are cleaned in a similar way. Dirt adhering to the coating can be removed with a damp cloth, using a mild soap if needed. Minor scratches and scuff marks in the coating itself can be removed using one of several special purpose patent leather and poromeric cleaners on the market.

Patent leather and poromerics are used in applications where an eye-catching glossy appearance is the main consideration. Examples include fashion items such as wallets and handbags, dance and uniform shoes, professional wrestling boots and fetish clothing.

The above article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Patent_leather).  5/4/05
 

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